Tag Archive: Anatomy of the Voice

“Float the Sound!”

choirs come in all shapes, sizes, and sounds! Every conductor will ask for something different... so how do we adapt?

“Float the Sound!” Singing jargon and the quest for vocal health           Those of you who have met me and been unfortunate enough to get me ranting about arbitrary images as a limited tool for explaining to singers what you want them to do, know that I whole-heartedly reject this practice. …

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Vocalprints and Retinal Scans

ThroatHurts-290x160

Vocalprints and Retinal Scans Considering the voice as a part of our identity          They say that no two people are created equal. Anatomically and physiologically this is especially true: our bodies are unique to us. This fact has even inspired the creation of technologies such as optical/fingerprint/vocal recognition security software.   …

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The Sing and Squat Conundrum (Part 2)

This may not be a perfect squat, but as a performer you may be required to sing in these types of positions. Using IAAs can help with this!

The Sing and Squat Conundrum (Part 2) Answering some questions…           I purposely left the last post with a lot of unanswered questions in hopes that people would start to really consider the implications of proper breathing during exercise and how it related to singing. I also acknowledge that another few …

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Breathe Deep(er)

Explanation of a basic kegal exercise for men and women.

Breathe Deep(er) The controversial and untapped breath-control power of the pelvic floor            I think I have heard more than a dozen voice teachers talk about “supporting your air from down there”. One of my old teachers told me that her voice teacher once recommended that she sing from her vagina. …

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The Inspirational King

The Inspirational King The truth about the mysterious and misunderstood diaphragm muscle           The diaphragm is my favourite muscle in the human body, and perhaps the most misunderstood (especially in the singing world). The diaphragm is responsible for an ability to maximize inhalation and therefore has earned the title (in my …

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Whose Air is it Anyway?

A schematic diagram of what happens during inhalation (left) and exhalation (right). During exhalation notice how the rib cage is squeezing the lungs as they exhale and they are getting smaller to push the air out.

Whose Air is it Anyway? The anatomical role of the lungs in breathing             The lungs are often the first structures anyone thinks about when they are considering breathing, and rightfully so. They are the reason we are able to take oxygen from the air and deliver it to our …

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Help! I Can’t Breathe!

take-deep-breath

Help! I Can’t Breathe! Exploring the “Art of Breathing” and its implications for healthy vocal production   There is no skill more critical to healthy vocal use than that of proper breathing.             When a student walks into my studio for the first time, whether they are a beginner or …

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The HOTTER Singer Dilemma

singing-into-the-fan

The HOTTER Singer Dilemma Why more moisture in the air isn’t necessarily a good thing for your voice             High Humidity is often overlooked when thinking about vocal issues because we have been taught: voice + moisture = good! From the earlier discussion about low humidity, we know that moisture …

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The Hot Singer Dilemma

Singing into a fan

The Hot Singer Dilemma How keeping cool when it’s hot out can be a challenge for your vocal health             ‘Tis the season when singers and other voice users start to realize a real unpredictability in their vocal health. Some days we wake up with throats as dry as desert …

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Vocomotion

the thinker

Vocomotion (potentially excessive) Musings on the voice for a forward-thinking world           Science and Music have never stood in outward opposition, and yet there has been an almost tangible polarity between the two academic circles. For example, the reaction I get when I tell people my undergrad is in Science and …

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